A heartfelt response to the gift of life

OHIP CARD reverse

 

Heart transplant recipient Blake Ferguson is at the London Health Sciences Centre to raise awareness about the need for organ and tissue donations.

This week is National Organ and Tissue Donation Awareness week.

Here’s our CTV London report about Blake’s story and the huge need for more donors. Special emphasis on this year’s national week is to raise awareness among health care workers.

http://london.ctvnews.ca/desperate-need-for-organ-donors-as-a-patient-on-waiting-list-dies-every-couple-of-days-1.1787447

And here’s a link to the online registry.

https://beadonor.ca/

The photo above shows on a health card that this person is a donor.

Does yours?

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3 thoughts on “A heartfelt response to the gift of life

  1. Kathy, I’ve been following this issue for decades, since I failed to get anyone here to donate my mother’s
    eyes as she requested, honouring our deceased father’s late life blindness. Too costly and too few knew what
    it was all about back then.
    The problem with much of the promotional activity is that it tells us there is a need, which is common knowledge,
    Not much any ibe individual can, we can’t suicide on demand when some organ is needed.
    Promotion fails to make it clear to anyone over 16 that there is now, in Ontario an online registry for those who wish to add their names to provincial pool of possible donors – not all organs etc. make suitable matches with patients
    in need. It is said only 1 in 20 offers can be taken up after match testing. This factual information is needed to understand how the process works it is not guaranteed your kindly offer will be taken up..One can’t force them
    to harvest your body parts.
    -Ask people to look at the back of their green photo OHIP card – it has a place to make your Donor intentions
    available to those who whose body need match the deceased offer
    Register with the Ministy and it will be encoded here.
    For those with the old card I think there a sticker stating your information.
    Walk us through this as potential donors someday, not distracting us with stories about those in need.
    I will send the image of my OHIP Card, which has recorded my Registration for nearly 20 years. This is not
    new, but someone is always rambling on about signing a paper wallet card – something that has been obsolete
    for years. Let me know if you want it.
    Or, if you or anyone in your own household 15 + has already Registered, show us an image of the reverse side
    of one of your provincial OHIP green photo cards. (No longer any identifying information is inscribed here, so more secure re privacy.

  2. TYPO 16 years. Website quote;
    …Act only permits individuals over 16 to register consent, and it does not allow parents to register their
    living children as organ/tissue donors. In the case of an untimely death of a child, parents will be approached
    and asked for their consent in the hospital if a child can be an organ/tissue donor
    Your child may register himself or herself as an organ/tissue donor when he/she reaches the age of 16.
    This is the delicate area, parents in shock asked to have their little one’s body interfered with. These parts
    would be highly desirable transplant material, so families need to talk about how they would handle such
    a request for any relevant individual who is identified as worthy of harvesting – knowing that it may never happen.

  3. You really have to wonder about the sincerity of media – twice in
    a few weeks the Globe in Toronto has given tear-jerker coverage
    re the need for transplant-worthy body parts, and then referred to
    signing a ‘donor card’. These easily-misplaced and outdated of bits
    of paper have been obsolete for years in Ontario – the central Registry
    being established at least by 1997 as with the card shown above.
    So apparently these prominent journalists do not themselves offer to
    be donors Humph.

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