Irked that charity has my mailing address

I received a letter in the mail Thursday from the Toronto Human(e) Society.

I have never given them a donation or had any correspondence with them. So how did they get my address?

I phoned the society right away and was forwarded to a woman in the donations department. I left her a voice mail asking that she call me. I have not heard back yet.

We know that subscriber lists can be sold and that charities share lists. It is recommended that you only donate to charities that protect privacy but how do you know who sold you out?

If this woman does call me back I will ask her this question.

In the meantime, I am not pleased with the Toronto Human(e) Society. (I’m sure they do good work, but this is disappointing.)

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12 thoughts on “Irked that charity has my mailing address

  1. Kathy, I wouldn’t waste too much energy on the Toronto Humane Society appeal.
    We get maillings and phone calls from several fundraising causes with which we
    have no connection. You are unlikely to find out what lists they are using. Look at
    it carefully – is it even mailed from the THS office address, or a commercial firm?
    You could mail that one back to the society, addressed perhaps a senior staff
    person or board member from its website information with a note that you are
    displeased to be on their mailing list and that they even have your home address.

  2. Just looked up its website. Lots of names/ email addresses to complain to –
    and cheaper than phoning some clerical down in Toronto. And you can mention
    you have a blog, and this is a current topic.

  3. Speaking of spelling, how do you like the November 11th “remeberance” day bar event
    advertisement out of the Prime Minister’s hometown using a 1945 VJ Day photo of an
    American sailor in Times Square grabbing a woman in white and kissing her, this date
    re the “Fallen” not even on the USA calendar. [Coverage LFP today,others parroting]
    And Canadian vets interviewed claiming it “sexualizes” that date, instead of them plus
    Sun reporter laughing off the culturally illiterate bar owner and the poster designer’s goofs.

  4. Speaking of spelling, how do you like the November 11th “remeberance” day bar
    event advertisement out of the Prime Minister’s hometown using a 1945 VJ Day
    photo of an American sailor in Times Square grabbing a woman in white and
    kissing her, this date re the “Fallen” not even on the USA calendar. [Coverage
    LFP today,others parroting]
    And Canadian vets interviewed claiming it “sexualizes” that date, instead of them
    plus Sun reporter laughing off the culturally illiterate bar owner and poster designer
    goofs.
    –that should fit !

  5. The bar owner must be thrilled at all the free publicity his vulgar promotion
    is receiving. It really should be laughed off, not taken seriously. However if
    you read back in the Toronto Globe online archives (free access through
    library card number) you find 24 hour partying on 1918 Armistice Day,
    celebrating victory over Germany. For 1919, George V calls for two minutes
    of silence at the 11th hour in remembrance of the fallen in the conflict. In 1921
    the night of November 11 saw the Dreadnought Ball where everyone who
    was anyone from Governor General down was partying at the King Edward,
    “jolly parties” held elsewhere. One of the celebrants at the hotel was Mme.
    Guerin of Paris who brought us 2 million handcrafted red Flanders poppies
    originally for Tag Days for French War orphans, then proceeds shared with
    the Great War Veterans Association, then manufacture by and proceeds to
    needy Returned Soldiers/vets. Eventually the Legion clubs were formed and
    permitted a monopoly on the iconry which emerged from our great Canadian
    war poem “In Flanders Fields”. What a simple introduction it had, tucked into
    a cornerat the bottom of a page in UK’s ‘Punch’ for Dec. 8 1915, authorless.
    (When they got a name they misspelled it.) From there the imagery went viral..
    Wonder what would have happened re the Calgary fiasco if they had used
    the poppy image, and brought the wrath of the Legion clubs down on them.
    The error is in thinking the Kiss was sexual – when it was merely a jubillant
    smack on the lips of an Austrian-born dental assistant, not a nurse, by a
    sailor learning that he would not have to go to war anymore. Japan was
    defeated.

  6. Thanks for all of the historical info Lest we forget.
    I grew up in a generation that felt Remembrance Day was a solemn affair. Still believe that. We can raise a toast to the war dead and the vets but partying doesn’t seem like the right thing to do.

  7. It is a solemn national day of mourning and partying makes no sense now.
    But to me focussing on those who survived the wars is inappropriate, too
    much like the US celebrating the living on the 11th, not the fallen. Those
    who once served in the military are just one class of mourners on this day,
    as with those families who have been bereaved in conflicts, those who
    recognize the significance of our military history and those in uniform now.
    Maybe we need to raise a glass to the Services, the regiments etc. and
    their past and present members on Warriors Day in the fall, not confusing
    those Who are left toGrow Old, to rest in civilian family graves with those
    who did not come back or even have a grave at all. All those names in the
    Virtual War Memorial of Canada and inscribed in Remebrance Books
    The Legion clubs do very well out of this poppy Tag Day monopoly, and
    should keep a lower profile on November 11th. One barely hears of the
    female representative of Canada’s bereaved families in all the club male
    blue blazered interviews.
    Again, this is media frenzy is about one little liquor business in one city.
    now doubt hoping to make money next monthfrom a tasteless idea.

  8. Here’s our national War Museum on the subject –
    Armistice Day becomes Remembrance Day
    Armistice Day and Thanksgiving remained linked for the next decade.
    Held every year on the Monday before November 11, Thanksgiving was
    celebrated with special dinners at home and sports and other activities
    outside. These normally passed quietly and went unnoticed by the press.
    In contrast, even though it was not an official holiday, November 11 saw
    large and serious minded gatherings at local cenotaphs and also on
    Parliament Hill in Ottawa, which usually received intensive press coverage.
    This unpopular anomaly could not last. At its founding convention in
    Winnipeg in November 1925, the Canadian Legion passed a resolution
    affirming that Armistice Day should be held only on November 11 and led
    a campaign to have this enacted by Parliament.
    On March 18, 1931, A.W. Neil, MP for Comox-Alberni in British Columbia,
    introduced a motion in the House of Commons to have Armistice Day
    observed on November 11 and “on no other date.” Concerns about the
    holiday’s impact on business, he claimed, were “irrelevant.” At the same
    time, another MP, C.W. Dickie of Nanaimo, also speaking on behalf of
    veterans, moved an amendment changing the name from “Armistice” to
    “Remembrance” Day. This term, he felt, better “implies that we wish to
    remember and perpetuate.” As historian Denise Thompson suggested,
    “term ‘Remembrance Day’ placed the emphasis squarely upon memory
    – and by extension upon the soldiers whose deaths being remembered
    – rather than upon the Armistice, a political achievement in which
    rank-and-file soldiers were not directly involved.” Parliament quickly
    adopted these resolutions, and Canada held its first ‘Remembrance Day’
    on November 11, 1931.
    Since 1931 Remembrance Day has remained the official title for the annual
    commemoration ever since, although the term “Armistice Day,” is sometimes
    used interchangeably, but unofficially. “Remembrance Day,” a more flexible
    and inclusive term, readily accommodates the remembrance of war dead
    from the Second World War, Korean War, other conflicts and peacekeeping.
    .. Remembrance Day ceremonies offer veterans the opportunity to remember
    and salute fallen comrades, and all Canadians an occasion to reflect on the
    sacrifices made and the tragedies endured in their name.
    -When we get nearer the date, you might want to look at images from 1921
    newspapers as London joined the rest of Canada inincorporating the poppy
    imagery into its commemorations.

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